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Open House On-Campus | Live Online Art Classes

 
We are thrilled to offer our students the choice of on-campus and online classes this fall with our stellar line-up of art industry professionals!  Students who are local and from around the world can now enjoy a top quality educational learning experience.

Fall Open House On-Campus

We invite you to our Fall Open House on September 14th starting at 10am.  During the day’s festivities you may tour the school, enjoy complimentary demos, meet instructors and staff, learn about our programs, receive a complimentary portfolio review, win a prize and much more… This will be the last day to enroll in our continuing education classes and receive early registration prices.  Please RSVP to receive more information on the days list of event times. See you soon!

Online Live Classes Start September 8th

If you are unable to attend our on-campus classes, we invite you to take your next traditional or digital class online with our esteemed professional instructors who work for top studios such as:  Blue Sky Studios, Disney, Dreamworks, Riot Games, Universal and many more… Our online live classes are held in real-time where students are able to interact with the instructors directly.  A typical class will include: Demo, lecture, in-class exercise, critiques and homework. We have a special introductory rate of $495.  Limited seats are available.  Enroll Now! Images above by:  Rey Bustos, Daniel Bilmes and Sam Michlap.

Online Courses | Bluecanvas Article | Winter Registration

Online “Drawing the Portrait in Charcoal” course by Nathan Fowkes

We are thrilled to announce the release of our latest online course with Nathan Fowkes, “Drawing the Portrait in Charcoal”, now open for registration, starting January 21, 2013.  Space is limited!

This online course is a serious exploration of drawing the portrait from life in charcoal. Over the course of the class, Nathan will provide each student with the necessary understanding and experience to draw the human head with authority.  Watch the preview video and learn more here.

 

Online “3D Anatomy/Ecorché” course by Rey Bustos

A fabulous online course, Rey Bustos’ “3D Anatomy/Ecorché” starting January 28, 2013 is also open for registration for critique and self-study courses. Space is limited!

If you are a fan of Rey Bustos, you must experience him in a classroom setting with students present.  The interaction between Rey and his students adds another dimension to his teaching since the questions posed by the students and the energy of the classroom environment lead Rey to veer off to lecture on topics that wouldn’t normally be covered if he was lecturing to a camera.  Watch the preview video and learn more here.

Bluecanvas Magazine Article

We are excited that Bluecanvas Magazine has chosen LAAFA for their most recent school collaboration article, issue #14. You may check out the full article here.  In addition, Bluecanvas is sponsoring a contest for a $10,000 Entertainment Art Scholarship at LAAFA!  Click here to check out the contest details! You can also order your own copy online or at your local bookstore.

 

Van Nuys & Santa Monica Classes start January 14th

While we are in the midst of the hustle and bustle of the holidays, we want to remind you to take a breath and think about taking some fantastic art classes with our talented instructors!  Choose from a variety of beginning and advanced classes:

* Portrait & Figure Painting/Drawing
* Figure Construction
* Quick Sketch
* Perspective and Character Design
* Still Life
* Long Pose Painting & Drawing
* Ecorché or Zbrush
* Imaginative Animal Design/Drawing

 

Instructor image by:  Noah Buchanan

Winter Quarter Schedule | 10-Year Anniversary Party

Winter Quarter Classes

Registration is open for our winter quarter classes.  We have a fabulous selection of classes and we are also introducing new classes such as:  Character Design (From Life Drawing), Imaginative Animal Design/Drawing, Tonal Figure Drawing, Figure Painting (Indirect, 17th Century Technique), Female Portrait Study (Drawing, Sculpting to ZBrush), Introduction to Head/Figure Painting and more…  At your convenience, please click on the image for your own personal PDF copy of all of our classes.

Be sure to check out our website often for updated 2013 workshops listings.  We add additional workshops regularly.




 

 

 

10-Year Anniversary Party

Come Celebrate with LAAFA & Bluecanvas Magazine

What if you could be a part of a thriving art community? Where you can find painters, animators, gamers, writers and filmmakers. A place to feel inspired, creative and productive. A space that connects us.

Please join us in our quest in providing an art library, resource center, and gallery to benefit all artists.

December 7th, from 6pm to 10pm (Bergamot Station)

RSVP and find out additional information here.

Ecorche/3D Anatomy w/ Rey Bustos – Weeks 6-9

“Muscle Memory”

During weeks 6 through 9 in Ecorche with Rey Bustos at LAAFA we added “musculature” to our ecorches. Using “chocolate” Sculpey, we crafted each muscle according to helpful guidelines Rey provided for us.

 

With Rey’s detailed drawings and demonstrations to lead us in the right direction, we worked our way up the body, all the way from lower leg, through the abdomen and upper body to the facial muscles.

 

Stay tuned for the exciting conclusion of Ecorche with Rey Bustos at LAAFA in our upcoming Week 10 blog post.

 

 

Ecorche/3D Anatomy w/ Rey Bustos – Spray Paint & Varnish

One of the most transformational parts of Ecorche with Rey Bustos at LAAFA was spray painting the baked ecorche.  I was careful to mask the hand and foot that I wanted to remain the fleshy color of Sculpey with aluminum foil before painting.  You can see below how a light coat of off-white spray paint really shows off all the sculpting work that goes into the skeletal portion of the ecorche.

In class, Rey had a “varnishing station’ set up for us. We lightly brushed varnish over our spray painted ecorches. We only applied the varnish to the left side, the side that will remain as exposed skeleton. We left the right side coated with spray paint only, so the clay we apply to represent muscles will stick. The effect of the varnish over the spray paint is fantastic- don’t you think?

Ecorche/3D Anatomy w/ Rey Bustos – Week 5

I can’t believe we have already reached the halfway point- week 5 in Ecorche with Rey Bustos at LAAFA!  Class number five focused largely on process, as this week’s tasks were to complete the skeletal body and “bake” the ecorche to permanently harden the Sculpey.

In class, Rey demonstrated how to finish the delicate bones of the lower arm, the radius and the ulna.  Rey recommended stringing the tiny finger bones onto the wire like beads. This simple technique creates a sophisticated skeletal model of the
human hand.

For the fleshed out right hand, Rey drew us a diagram of the palm. He encouraged us to make our ecorches’ hands expressive, and to add creases, or flexure lines, for a lifelike effect.  Everyone had more than enough armature wire to support the fingers on each hand.
We just cut off what we didn’t need after
completing both hands.

The next lecture topic was Rey’s favorite bone: the scapula.  I have to admit, floating like wings on the human back, scapulae are beautiful bones.  Rey showed us how to mold the organic protrusions that define the scapulae. He also showed us how to attach the left scapula so that only the socket, or glenoid fossa rests against the head of the humerus. As you can see, this was a well-documented moment of the class. 😉

Back at home, I carefully followed the written instructions Rey gave us on baking our ecorches. Behold! Five weeks of sculpting permanently set in polymer clay! Now, before adding the muscles, all I have to do is paint and varnish the bones.
I’ll post an update on the painting and finishing process soon!

Ecorche/3D Anatomy w/ Rey Bustos – Week 4

Week 4 in Ecorche with Rey Bustos at LAAFA was action-packed!

During the first part of class, Rey led students in bending wire to create five-pronged armatures for the right and left hands.  

The design of Rey’s ecorche features a moveable left elbow joint, so we made the wire armature for the left forearm and hand as a separate piece. I taped mine to my ecorche’s ground for safekeeping.

After a series of neat accordion bends and just one snip with wire-cutters, we had the armature for our ecorches’ right hands in place as well.

With the final armature building behind us, we moved on to the triple topic of the day: vertebra-thorax-humeri. In English, that’s spine-ribcage-upper arm bones.  
Rey showed us his neat technique for representing the vertebra in a believable way as a group.  Rey guarantees that this “grouped” approach poses less of a risk to mental health than attempting to sculpt each vertebra individually. I can vouch for the technique, but you’ll have to take the class to find out what it is. 😉

Rolling out the ribs and building the support surfaces for future “muscles” on the right side of our ecorches filled the rest of the class.

The support clay on the right side of the ecorche does not represent any anatomical structures in the human body. However, for our ecorches, this support will be necessary when we begin to add muscle to the figures in two weeks. Rey made sure each student’s ecorche was on track before dismissing class.

Our homework for the week was to install the support clay, complete the humeri, and finish the ribcage with a sternum. Here’s the result of my best efforts:

Ecorche/3D Anatomy w/ Rey Bustos – Week 3

Students in Rey Bustos’s Ecorche class at LAAFA started week 3 by covering the wire and nails holding their ecorche upright with clay. This clay was the beginning of the ground our ecorches would come to stand on… after we took care of the small matter of sculpting the 3 bones of the lower leg and the 26 bones of the foot!  Fortunately, Rey’s design of the ecorche “fleshes out” the right foot, so in all we only had 33 bones to sculpt.  Now that class is over, and I’ve completed my homework, I can’t believe how much we learned and got done this week!  Rey kept his lecture brief so we would have time to get started on sculpting those 33 bones!

Rey advised that we start with the feet, and then work our way up to the tibia, fibula, and patella that make up the lower leg.  To create the bones of the skeletal foot, Rey advised that we use top-view printed anatomical guides and “draw” the bones into our clay. The method really worked!

Photo by Ryan Patterson

Soon we had our skeletal left feet completed.  Rey demonstrated how to create toes, toenails, and tendons for a lifelike look on the right foot.  As a final touch, he added red calluses and blue-green veins in watercolor paint.

Rey gave a final demonstration to show us how to “cook” the two small bones of the lower leg in hot water.  The fibula is a very thin bone that we will eventually wrap in “muscle” on our ecorches, so we used a wire for support.  The patella (kneecap), however, is not connected to the skeleton by any bony structure, so we used a wire to show the patella’s “floating” position.  Check out my ecorche’s little left fiblua and patella enjoying their hot bath- aren’t they cute? 😉

Ta-dah! Here is my ecorche’s newly completed lower skeleton! Check back next week to see what we learn in week 4!

 

Ecorche/3D Anatomy w/ Rey Bustos – Week 2

 

The hip-bone’s connected to the thigh-bone….

Week 2 of Rey Bustos’s Ecorche/ 3D Anatomy class at LAAFA introduced the two major bones of the lower body: the pelvis and the femur.

To simplify the daunting task of rendering the pelvis in 3D, Rey started with a less-intimidating concept – a square.  Two squares, actually, drawn together in a rectangle. You can see this rectangle on the blackboard in the photo at right.  So far, so good.

Rey then used the framework of these squares to guide students in drawing the pelvis in 2D.  We drew our own maps of anatomical terrain most of us had only previously used… well… to sit on.  Keeping up with the lecture and Rey’s detailed drawing (left) kept us busy!  We learned the five “landmarks” of the pelvis to look for on a live model. In addition, we learned how even the invisible bony bumps under layers of muscle and soft tissue affect the visible parts of the human body.  Good stuff!

When we were ready to start adding the clay “skeleton” to our wire armature, Rey lent a hand and gave a brief demo to get us started.

Then we were on our own!

Moving on to the femur, Rey gave another brief lecture. Since we all now had at least part of the pelvis completed, Rey’s approach to the femur emphasized its connectedness to the pelvis and the rest of the skeleton.  Again starting with a simple concept, Rey showed us how to form the head of the femur from a clay “worm” wrapped around our wire armature.  Rey left us on our own to work for the rest of class, but was always on hand to answer questions and provide help.

I can hardly wait for tomorrow’s class! Here’s my completed Week 2 homework.

Ecorche/3D Anatomy w/ Rey Bustos – Week 1

Rey Bustos is the wonderful kind of teacher who makes you feel like you are getting your money’s worth out of his class – down to every last penny! Last Sunday, April 15th, Rey’s Ecorche/ 3D Anatomy class at LAAFA started with students arriving 30 to 60 minutes BEFORE the start of class so that Rey could help us all get the main portion of our armature wire bent into shape.

Rey expertly turned yard after yard of straight wire into the basic frame for a 16″ replica of a human statuette or ecorche. In French, ecorche means “flayed” and refers to the fact that a finished ecorche sculpture looks like it has had the skin removed so you can see the muscles and bones.

Our ecorches were only just beginning to take shape. All along the way, Rey guided us in measuring, bending, and wrapping our wire.

After the wire supports for the arms and legs were bent into place, the next task was bending wire to support the clay ribcage we will be building in future classes.  Rey guided students through the first four ribs and assigned the remaining eight as homework for students who couldn’t get them done in class.

Rey provided illustrations of the human ribcage from all angles to guide our wire wrapping and bending.  Even though I thought I knew what a ribcage looked like, looking at the diagrams showed me the human ribcage in more detail that I imagined it could possibly contain.

I realized that there is a big gap between knowing enough to merely identify a ribcage, and the intimate understanding that comes from a tactile experience of its form.  Like an eager student aboard Ms. Frizzle’s Magic School Bus, I can’t wait to see what part of the body Rey will introduce us to next week!

We finished class by securing our wire armatures to 12″ wooden boards with double pointed tacks.  Students with time to spare were able to start rolling their Super Sculpey into sheets to allow it to firm up a bit for next week’s class.

Week 1 of Ecorche/ 3D Anatomy was a lot of work, but the results were satisfying.

We went from this:

           
I’ll be posting every week as the Spring 2012 Ecorche/ 3D Anatomy class with Rey Bustos progresses, so stay tuned!